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my stuff

23 Jul

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ThingsCon Salon Berlin July videos are up!

July 23, 2017 | By |

On 14th July we had another ThingsCon Salon Berlin. You can learn more about upcoming ThingsCon events here.

Here’s the presentations!

Gulraiz Khan

Gulraiz Khan (@gulraizkhan) is a transdisciplinary designer who works on civic engagement. As an urbanist, he is interested in developing grassroots engagement methods that can help communities thrive through political and environmental flux. He is currently working as a Lecturer in Communication & Design at Habib University in Karachi, Pakistan. Prior to this, he received an MFA in Transdisciplinary Design from Parsons The New School for Design in New York. He also serves at the Assistant Director for The Playground, the Centre for Transdisciplinarity, Design and Innovation at Habib University.

Peter Bihr

Peter Bihr (@peterbihr) gave a few remarks about the trip and available for an informal chat about Shenzhen.

Screening of View Source: Shenzhen

We screened the brand new video documentary about the ThingsCon trip to Shenzhen. Produced by The Incredible Machine with support from the Creative Industry Fund NL, this is the video counterpart to the written View Source: Shenzhen report we just published and shows the journey that The Incredible Machine had when trying to build a smart bike lock in Shenzhen.

Hope to see you soon at a ThingsCon event near you!

23 Jul

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08 Oct

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IoT Communities & modes of production

October 8, 2016 | By |

For Retune Festival 2016, I gave a quick overview of IoT communities and their modes of production. Heads-up, this is quite subjective: The IoT communities featured here are the ones I personally find most interesting and/or am most fond of.

The extra short version is this: Exploring IoT in its various facets can be done in many ways, from the often un- or under-funded (art) to the often highly funded (startup) and everything in between. I argue that startups, while currently a hugely popular vehicle to explore ideas, aren’t for everyone: There are some things and contexts that I think are better explored outside a startup context, through self-funding, third party funding, or as a sustainable independent business.

Hope it’s useful for you.

17 Nov

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Launching Dearsouvenir, a digital travel magazine

November 17, 2015 | By |

dearsouvenir cover

The biggest news for me this month: We launched a magazine.

Dearsouvenir has officially launched So happy about this! The magazine explores travel through the stories behind souvenirs. I couldn’t be happier with the way it turned out, too.

Issue one clocks in at more than 280 pages of travel & souvenir goodness and explores three destinations: Berlin, Mexico City and the Italian region Veneto.

Did I mention that there are two full language versions, one in English and one German – and that it’s free? You’re welcome. I hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

A big thank you to all collaborators and contributors. Especially Wolfgang, with whom every project is pure joy, the most excellent and energetic Carry-On crew around Theresa, Antonia and Alex, as well as Will for his massive help building the iOS app and his incredible patience with me.

Dearsouvenir is a project Wolfgang and I have been working on – on and off – for years, and it’s gone through a lot of iterations before we got to where it is today: A tablet-first magazine combined with an iOS app that lets you find souvenirs near you.

What are you waiting for? Download the magazine from Google Play (EN / DE) or the Apple app store (search for Dearsouvenir Magazine). If you’re on iOS, I highly recommend also picking up the complementary “to go” iOS Dearsouvenir app to discover the best souvenirs in our launch destinations Berlin, Mexico City and Veneto.

20 Oct

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Understanding the Connected Home: Shared connected objects

October 20, 2015 | By |

This blog post is an excerpt from Understanding the Connected Home, an ongoing exploration on the implications of connectivity on our living spaces. (Show all posts on this blog.) The whole collection is available as a (free) ebook: Understanding the Connected Home: Thoughts on living in tomorrow’s connected home

As anyone who’s lived in a shared household can attest, there will be objects that you share with others.

Be it the TV remote, a book, the dining room table, or even the dishes, the connected home will not doubt be filled with objects that will be used by multiple people, sometimes simultaneously and sometimes even without the owner’s permission.

On the whole, you find wealth much more in use than in ownership. — Aristotle

Rival vs. non-rival goods

What will these shared, connected objects be like? What characteristics will define them?

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05 Oct

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Understanding the Connected Home: Augmentation not Automation

October 5, 2015 | By |

This blog post is an excerpt from Understanding the Connected Home, an ongoing exploration on the implications of connectivity on our living spaces. (Show all posts on this blog.) The whole collection is available as a (free) ebook: Understanding the Connected Home: Thoughts on living in tomorrow’s connected home

A pioneer in human-machine interfaces and a solver of unusual problems, Doug Engelbart – inventor of the computer mouse, among other things – had a mantra: augmentation not automation.

Engelbart’s work focused on the human intellect and how to improve it. Yet, his framework conceptual for augmenting the human intellect can guide our exploration of the connected home, too.

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22 Sep

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Understanding the Connected Home: Different kinds of things

September 22, 2015 | By |

This blog post is an excerpt from Understanding the Connected Home, an ongoing exploration on the implications of connectivity on our living spaces. The whole collection is available as a (free) ebook: Understanding the Connected Home: Thoughts on living in tomorrow’s connected home

The home is full of things that fall into various categories: furniture, lamps, appliances, gadgets, etc. For the connected home, we might need to re-examine these categories.

Which categorization scheme might lead us to interesting insights? Let’s explore a few.

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