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27 Apr

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Shenzhen travel log: Day 5

April 27, 2017 | By |

These are the quick & dirty travel notes from our second ThingsCon trip to Shenzhen, China. Read all posts from this series here (tag: ViewSourceII), or all blog posts relating to Shenzhen here (tag: Shenzhen). The latter one includes last fall’s trip to Shenzhen as well.

It’s ThingsCon Shenzhen day! I feel I’ve fully arrived: I’m totally in zen mode, happy to be in the moment and go with the flow.

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Flyer for ThingsCon Shenzhen

A big thank you to David Li and Vicky of the Shenzhen Open Innovation Lab (SZOIL) for making this event happen!


SZOIL


ThingsCon Shenzhen, doors open!

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Before the event starts, we have a little team huddle with David. He catches us up on some recent developments.

He shares the story of the kid from Laos who came to Shenzhen and built POS machines for Lagos’ street markets. It’s easy to forget that there are a lot of very, very different markets and approaches within IoT, and that Shenzhen truly manufactures for the whole world.

Today it’s cheaper to build a smart TV that runs Android than building a non-smart TV, David explains. The economics of large scale production can do wonderful, weird, twisted things.

A large shenzhai phone maker started making an electric car. We look it up: It looks a little like a golf cart and the interior seems cobbled together from medical equipment; it has no doors. But it’s a fully functional electric car. It’s about $1.000.

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There are around 50 people at the event, with a great mix of locals and visitors. Entrepreneurs, designers, some folks from incubators: a solid mix, it seems.

In Shenzhen, like everywhere, the movers and shakers seem to be the connectors that hop from place to place: Hong Kong, Taipei, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, London…

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Please note: The following are quick and dirty notes from some of the presentations. I paraphrased as best as I could to keep up.


David opening ThingsCon Shenzhen


My opening — always be repeating the ThingsCon mantra! (Thanks for the photo, Dietrich!)

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Jakie Yin of Rone Design is first. He showcases a wide range of connected industrial designs his company has been involved in. He also explains three distinct development phases for hardware:

  • Zero to one
  • One to hundreds
  • Hundreds to X

Each of them requires different skill sets, and/or partners. His company can help with pretty much all of them.

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Gabriel Ionut Zlamparet gives an intro to remanufacturing of used medical devices. Remanufacturing, re-use, designing for re-use has huge potential for sustainability. He share slides with great level of details.


Gabriel

Gabriel’s talk stresses the importance of design for re-use, refurbishment, longevity.

I learn a lot in little time. Below some of the slides that stood out for me (apologies for the bad photo quality):




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Malavika Jayaram (Digital Asia Hub) skypes in to talk about AI and ethics, and how they relate to IoT.


Malavika larger than life

Malavika explores the social and political aspects of connected technology. Some of the key points she makes:

  • Large-scale deployments of connected technology (like AI and #iot) frequently impact marginalized group disproportionately.
  • How do AI and machine learning apply to social issues? How can they be put to good use in this context?
  • “If you can’t be counted, you don’t count. If you’re not connected, you don’t count.”
  • The Chinese social credit system—and similar approaches everywhere—means that keeping (algorithmically) bad company would implicate you even though you might yourself be squeaky clean, like for example bad credit records.

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Dietrich Ayala (Mozilla) speaks about apps, app fatigue, onboarding, interfaces and IoT. A wide range, fantastic presentation.


Dietrich

Here’s what I managed to write down quickly enough:

  • “ZERO. The number of apps the average users installs in a month according to Google. People have app fatigue.”
  • “With IoT we have a new opportunity. The room is now the computer.”
  • One founder shared: 1.000 web views per app installation. 999 users left behind! It’s a choice!
  • In China, QR codes make connecting easy. Outside of China, QR codes are often still considered awkward.
  • QR codes and NFC are powerful connectors. But they have challenges. QR codes have to be big enough. Who scans whom? NFC needs signage to indicate it’s an option.
  • Beacons are an options, very powerful, but still expensive. Onboarding is super easy, though, a pop-up notification is a well-known interaction.
  • Maybe you don’t need speech to activate a thing. Noise might be enough! You can make valuable assumptions from very little data.
  • Frictionless augmented reality. It’s pretty easy to do now within web pages.

Dietrich shows lots of cool demos of lightweight web-based AR demos.


Dietrich demos an experimental AR interface for a music player

It’s becoming super easy to access user media, too:


This is all it takes to access user media for AR.

This doesn’t work on iOS yet, but hopefully this year. Since the global market share of iOS is tiny compared to Android, this shouldn’t stop you.

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Monique hosts a panel discussion with Iskander, Holly, Marcel and myself. We talk about responsible IoT, and how it can be applied in the day-to-day work we all do. Also, we try to explore if there’s a special angle that European indie IoT creators can bring in.

Since I was on the panel I can’t share any photos, but there you go.

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Marcel gives some closing remarks:


Note the second laptop in front of Marcel? It’s an impromptu hack to let people scan the QR code to join our Wechat event channel. It makes connecting with other participants incredible smooth. We should, of course, have put this QR code up on the big screen all along.

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David runs a spontaneous session on how to source components in Shenzhen. After all, running around on the market to find parts is a lot of fun but it’s not the efficient way to find anything. Instead, Wechat and Taobao are good starting points.


David

Tipps, strategies, useful things to know:

Shenzhen is full of so-called technical solution houses. Solution houses build very specific technical solutions, help you solve specific issues. Say find or build or adapt a certain board. Most customers don’t ask for exclusivity. So these solutions can be re-used. There are somewhere between 5-10K of them. They can help you source. You toss your requirements into a Wechat group: “Who has this?” You get a pretty good hit ratio: Either someone already has what you need, or they can help adapt it.


A solution house’s catalog.

Also, sometimes someone comes back to you and says: We’ve done this a year ago and couldn’t sell it. Are you sure you want to do this?

Wechat is the platform to find people and connect.

The timing also matters: During our last visit 6 months ago, smart bike locks were a fringe offering. Now, due to the big boom in sharing bike companies, there’s a wide range of offerings.

A lot of knowledge (technical, design, software) is in the technical solution houses. It’s often undocumented. This makes it hard to research: There might be really short roadmaps that aren’t shared. Wechat allows these providers to identify themselves and say: “Oh yes, we’re working on this, it’ll be ready in 4-6 weeks.” *Harm confirms this: Searching for bike lock companies, the team found one through Wechat and arranged for a meeting to discuss details. It was all arranged within days, if not hours. “We definitively didn’t find what we needed at the market. What we were looking for was too specific.” * These channels are for professionals. Wasting anyone’s time isn’t appreciated.


Harm’s sketchnotes are pretty awesome

Industrial design houses are also great interfaces for sourcing and more. They’re one abstraction level up, and they bring with them the connections to technical solution houses.

“There are no consultants in Shenzhen. No shipping, no money.”

Q: How about language barriers? When we visited design houses, our hosts spoke excellent English. How about solution houses? A: It’s one abstraction layer down, more in the background. The language barrier might be higher, and you’re often talking to engineers. (Design houses might offer a softer landing pad.) Wechat translation can also help if you collaborate in writing.

David: The golden days of the market are over. Used to be easy money: Source 100 phones, flip them by the afternoon with $10 margin each, you got $1.000 in your pocket.

David: We see more entrepreneurs not coming here with their giant valuations but with solid business models. It’s a good development. (It reminds me of how different the early days of web 2.0 felt compared to the craze of the dotcom boom. This sounds similar.)

Connections are built from social networking: Trust and personal recommendations/introductions. Some companies are more careful today about who to spend time and effort on, to filter out the non-serious folks. But then again, of course nobody knows how to find the 1% of great ideas.

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We end up chatting for quite a while, then disperse: Some folks have more market to explore, others visit a design university. Some have meetings. I do a last round on the market, then people watch for a while.

On a bench, a young guy asks if he can sit next to me. I learn he works for a company that assembles phones. I ask if I can see one: It’s a rose gold Android phone, the case looks solidly made at first glance. I don’t want to dig deeper; I’m not sure if he wants to sell and don’t want to encourage him, but he does have a bag of boxed phones with him.

“It runs Android.” “Which version?” “Don’t know, I’m not involved in that part.”

We chat for a bit, then I excuse myself. He stays and finishes his bubble tea.


TIME IS UP!

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A BYD (Chinese car maker) dashboard, topped by a Mao-shaped fragrance dispense #artefactsOfShenzhen

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A second (or maybe, uhm, third lunch snack)

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I bump into Dietrich, who shows me his haul: A lightweight Android VR headset.


Dietrich modeling his haul

I’m looking forward to checking out the demos he’s going to build for it.

26 Apr

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Shenzhen travel log: Day 4

April 26, 2017 | By |

These are the quick & dirty travel notes from our second ThingsCon trip to Shenzhen, China. Read all posts from this series here (tag: ViewSourceII), or all blog posts relating to Shenzhen here (tag: Shenzhen). The latter one includes last fall’s trip to Shenzhen as well.

A t-shirt: “Don’t be original. Just be good.”

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We visit x.factory. Impressive upscale maker space with great equipment. Funded by a real estate company, of course. Planned official opening for the complex is July, so for the most part the building complex is still empty.


Near the entrance of the new complex, this skate park (or possibly just landscaping)

Note the trees in the photo above? They’re recently planted, hence the stabilizer beams. The whole site used to be a hill made of solid rock. (Keep that in mind, we’ll come back to it later.)

x.factory is part of the Chaihuo family of maker spaces. We had been to their smaller outpost at OCT-LOFT before. (Chaihuo and Seeed are very tightly connected, nearly interchangeable it seems. Within China, the Chaihuo name is very well known; abroad Seeed is the recognized name.) Chaihuo was co-founded by Eric Pan, who also founded Seeed Studios.

Wayne Lin, Director of Operations at x.factory, kindly gives us some insight into the history and future of China’s maker spaces.


Wayne gives us the low-down on the Chinese maker space scene.


ThingsCon site visit to x.factory


A picture of Shenzhen in 1980.

First maker spaces in Shenzhen started around 2013. HAX as well, and added a lot of energy. 2015 was a giant breakthrough year for this community. The government, industry, community all see huge opportunities for IoT and maker communities.

Challenges:

  • Vast resources but manufacturing needs upgrades.
  • Lots of maker spaces but lack of projects. (Many makers go straight for startups instead.)


Makerspace gonna look like makerspace

I can’t help but think that this situation is kinda-sorta like the exact opposite of Europe, where there’s too many ideas and project but not enough time in the day to make them all happen.


Monique


Iskander

But what’s happening in and around these spaces is also a process of maturing, and professionalization. Wayne shares: We’ve been talking for a long time that we’d like to move from “made in China” to “innovate in China”. And it’s happening.

Vanke, a huge (formerly state-owned) real estate developer as a partner for one explains this super high-end looking building. It also means an obvious opportunity for those teams that work on IoT and especially smart buildings: Vanke could be the biggest buyer.

Resources like tooling and manufacturing are available easily here at x.factory. This is a recurring theme on this trip: Resources (including funding) seem to be available if you have the right idea.

A slide reads “Make with Shenzhen resources, at Shenzhen speed.” They mean it. Both.

x.factory’s business model: A mix of small-batch manufacturing, distribution of maker products, provide modules (components?) for production. They also work with corporates like China Mobile or Tencent R&D. in short: 1) Prototyping and developing tech modules 2) manufacturing services 3) distribution and sales

“We’re like translators. We help makers develop and sell their products.”

An audience question about open source: “We need more projects that use open source.” They want to make an impact this way, and see open source as an exciting opportunity.

Wayne gives some background about the role of real estate and why they are so interested in this space: The property market in China is crazy right now. This also means a huge market opportunity for smart building tech and IoT. All of China is a construction site, lots of new buildings go up all the time. But how do you drive people to your mall? That’s a big challenge for many developers.

Asked about the future of Shenzhen, he says: Shenzhen’s future still looks bright. It’s a young city. Average age is maybe 30 years old. It’s very innovative and entrepreneurial. It’s one of the most exciting cities in China. He adds: Sometimes more experienced people know better how to build a good life, more experienced designers know how to design better products even if it takes longer.

The concept of x.factory is that of an open factory, an open maker space. Openness and open source are at the core of the project. Many projects here have an impact way beyond one company.


Wayne during an interview for the documentary

We continue the conversation in a smaller group as part of an interview for the documentary that’s being shot about this trip.

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During an interview we hear choppers and explosions: For real estate development in this particular area, solid bedrock needs to be blown up. The very spot of the building complex we’re in used to be a hill of solid rock.


In the background, outside the windows, you can see the bedrock this complex is built on (and into).

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Outside the building, there’s a huge construction site.

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In an uber-cool and clean concrete and class office, behind a little curtain, there are a bunch of cots: A quiet corner for a post-lunch nap.

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Shenzhen’s official city motto: “Time is money, efficiency is life.”

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Maybe the most advanced smart rear view mirror I’ve spotted yet: This one show simultaneous live feeds from a front and back camera and records both—as far as I can tell in full HD.


Smart review mirror with full HD video recording

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Idea: Chinese maker spaces have great resources and expertise but lack projects. European creatives and entrepreneurs are full of ideas but might lack the time and resources to realize them.

Can we team up European creatives with design schools to share their project ideas, then master students under supervision by a professor, and in close collaboration with the creatives, own these projects and drive them. They realize them in China with the expertise and resources of Chinese makerspaces.

Chinese spaces get projects, students can cut their teeth, the ideas get realized. Everybody wins!

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A QR code on our lunch tables replaces the menu: Scan in Wechat to order and pay from your phone. Next level convenience.


Scan QR code to order and pay your lunch.

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I can’t get over the fact that the new HuaqiangBei road, simply by becoming a pedestrian zone, makes the whole area feel so much more tame than it felt to me just half a year ago.

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This, too, is an electric bike. They don’t have to be fancy.

24 Apr

By

Shenzhen travel log: Day 2

April 24, 2017 | By |

These are the quick & dirty travel notes from our second ThingsCon trip to Shenzhen, China. Read all posts from this series here (tag: ViewSourceII), or all blog posts relating to Shenzhen here (tag: Shenzhen). The latter one includes last fall’s trip to Shenzhen as well.

Today the group splits up into two. Part does factory visits. I join team Velocracy.


Harm as we arrive at our local work HQ

I ask for an updated pitch for Velocracy.


Harm explains Velocracy


Velocracy, early prototype

Here’s the pitch; I hope I represent it correctly.

Velocracy is a decentralized bike sharing platform built on the Etherium blockchain and smart contracts. It focuses on the parties are involved in making the sharing bike, notably manufacturers and maintenance/assembly company . Other middlemen/centralizing organizations are cut out to allow a focus on users instead. The assumption is that the price is going to be be cheaper because there’s one organization less to feed. It might even be a first step, potentially, towards a universal sharing platform.

Challenges are plenty given this is a highly explorative, experimental development: How to deal with unintended use, theft, attacks on the system? Which hardware securely interfaces with the blockchain setup? How can this be made open source?

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“The First Chinese Electronic Commercial Street of HiaquangBei”


At HuaquiangBei, local police removes a whole bunch of rental bikes.

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Monday morning, 10:30h. We set up a temporary HQ in a local coworking space.


Wait-a-minute. Something’s not right here!


The documentary team is plotting shots


Oh, just a couple mini robots at the coworking space.

Meetings that the team hadn’t been able to arrange remotely in advance all start to materialize on extremely short notice. Within an hour, the week ahead fills up.


Ahn making meetings happen

We’ll be meeting potential suppliers, many of whom have tremendous experience with bike sharing and smart locks.

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Shenzhen Design Week


Design for the future


All the locals were striking a pose, and we didn’t want to be left out

Design Week is a decentralized event, spread out all over the city. There’s a main hub, though, and we visit. Lots of industrial design in a former grain processing factory next to the waterfront, called i-Factory: A China Merchant Group property, formerly zoned for shipping and industrial use, now on the verge of luxury developments. China Merchant Group plays a significant role in the development of Shenzhen, with 160 years of developing the city through commerce.


Street art at i-Factory


Street art at i-Factory


Fantastic perspective play at i-Factory (the bike is real, the riders are painted on the wall)


Street art at i-Factory. Love the contrast between the motif and the “Design is Future” poster.


Signage at i-Factory. My personal favorite is the mysterious superhero, third from left.

The design is presented in a nicely industrial setting, but it’s a little empty; there aren’t any designers to talk to, it seems. It feels very different from the Industrial Design Fair we visited half a year ago: Here it’s a giant showcase, but a little more stale.


Alas, the Future was closed today


MAKE space


Design fair


China Good Design

We discover the connected products section. Let’s put a chip on it! The range goes from temperature-sensing baby bottles to connected speakers and cleaning robots with security cameras.


VR is always big in China


A smart anti-snoring mat. Not pictured: Giant air pump.

Next door, a more traditionally-oriented industrial design exhibition showcases Red Star Awards.


Not everything at the design fair is electronics: Here’s a bunch of fountain pens

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As part of the design fair, there’s an information corner on Shenzhen.


What’s the Sandwich class? It’s professionals working in Shenzhen but not financially able to buy an apartment. They’re considered kind of a lost segment on the lower middle class. The housing boom has priced them out of a chance to be home owners, which is hugely problematic in Chinese society.

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We visit OCT Loft, a former industrial and now creative/tech/innovation complex.

At the local Chaihuo makerspace we see a smart lamp: It automatically adjusts the light levels, and if nobody is close-by for 10-15 seconds it switches off to save energy. I would have been underwhelmed—this isn’t a big design coup for a large corporate. Then I learn who made it: A group of 3 kids in 5th grade—10 or 11 years old—built this, from prototype to final product. Programming and making skills start in year 1 of their syllabus.


This smart lamp was design by a group of three 5th graders. That’s right: 10-11 year olds made this connected lamp.

There’s been a recent boom in maker spaces, and the local government subsidizes them. This one focuses, in line with the founder’s policy, on building out a wide base of makers, on which large scale maker driven innovation can be built.

The conversation also reveals that the generation between 20 and 30 in China faces lots of pressure, commercial and social alike (think career and family planning). This is in (relatively) stark contrast to Europe, where the decade between 20 and 30 tends to be one of the most free.

We also hear about “bio payments”, contact-less payments via implanted chips, developed by a Spanish startup via Shenzhen. There’s a lot happening here.

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We see smart rear-view mirrors everywhere. This one display’s a compass.

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More bike sharing:


Cash rewards for Mobike

Mobike, the (probably?) largest Chinese bike sharing program offers “red envelope” rewards, meaning: Cash. You just got to be the first to claim it from any of these bikes. It’s an aggressive customer acquisition scheme.

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A quick scan of HuaqiangBei market gives us a bit of an update of what’s happening, and the newcomers a moment to get oriented. We’ll be back with more time and a permit to film later.

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Lots of social life–restaurants, bars, etc.—happens in shopping malls. Malls are ubiquitous in downtown Shenzhen. Absolutely everywhere.


The group seems to grow larger and larger with every dinner.

After two nights of mall dinners the group craves a drink in a bar somewhere other than a pub. Tomorrow night we’ll eat outside an air-conditioned shopping complex, somewhere, wherever. But tonight, it’s 9pm and we want to sit outside somewhere with a cold beer. Easier said than done: Our neighborhood, downtown Shenzhen—more concretely HuaqiangBei—is a business district of sorts. During the day, there’s great food to be had. At night, it’s a little empty.

After a quick pitstop on the terrace of a mall bakery with French croissants and Belgian beers, on Tina and Harm’s initiative we venture a walk to another neighborhood. We end up somewhere else entirely, out on the sidewalk with some fried noodles and cans of Tsingtao and fruit juice, and it’s excellent. This is China alright.


Curb drinks in a local spot. Tina’s Chinese language skills save the night.

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23 Apr

By

Shenzhen travel log: Day 1

April 23, 2017 | By |

These are the quick & dirty travel notes from our second ThingsCon trip to Shenzhen, China. Read all posts from this series here (tag: ViewSourceII), or all blog posts relating to Shenzhen here (tag: Shenzhen). The latter one includes last fall’s trip to Shenzhen as well.

Software eats the world. Nowhere is this move obvious, more graspable than at the Huaqiang markets: You can still feel how diverse a line-up of devices has once existed here. These days, smartphone (and accessories) have taken over huge parts of what was once almost certainly a hugely more diverse market.

That said, there’s a lot of smartphone accessories. And drones. So. Many. Drones.

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A guy walks by, whispering in the conspiratorial tone of drug dealers, “iPhone 7?” He won’t be the only one today.

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It’s Sunday, 11am. The market is open. It’s quiet, not much going on. But the main floors are open.

Usually the CPARK showroom is a showroom for high-end industrial design of sorts.


Drones, drones, drones!


Beautiful boards

In there’s mayhem of a different sort. An educational DIY robot event is ongoing, and dozens of kids are squeaking with joy as they build and race their robots.


Robo race


A cute little DIY paper robot

On a shelf, a little expo piece has scribbled on it the words “bricks’R’knowledge”.

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A salad place called Sexy Salad. A huge wall print sport the tagline “Sexy Life / Salad On”.

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The metro is super easy to navigate, and luckily for me plenty of signage is available in English. That said, without being able to pay via phone, you need to stand in line at ticket machines for a long time, with more or less exact change. A single ride in the city runs around 3-7 Yuan (roughly 40-80 Eurocents).

metro plan
Temporary Shenzhen HQ: Huaqiang Bei

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More Mobikes.

More mobikes

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Quick refreshment to go. €0.40.


Half a year past its Best Before date. But what’s half a year among friends?

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Visited Dafen village. In the 1990 it started out as an artist enclave or urban village that produced lots of replica paintings (Wikipedia). (Note: Many of these paintings presumably long have entered the public domain.)

Dafen is in fact situated in between huge residential high rises, see the pic from the metro station:

Dafen metro
This is the view from Dafen metro. The village is a village only in name. In fact, I believe Urban Village is an administrative term in Shenzhen.

Everything in this little urban village revolves around art. Most of it is the making and selling of paintings. But you can also get art supplies. Or frames. So many frames.

art supplies
Art supplies for sale in Dafen


Frameshop in Dafen Village

Dafen Art Museum
Dafen Art Museum

It’s a little hard to tell if this is still the main thing and which role local artists produce in their own right. It’s especially hard since the (supposedly pretty good) Dafen Art Museum seemed to be under renovation, and only one floor was open—and the exhibition there focused on local art students’ rendering of everyday objects:

Note the little info plaques next to the images? They include QR codes so you can follow the artists!

I enjoyed it a great deal, and frankly would’ve bought and hung quite a few of them, but this being the museum they weren’t for sale.

Walking through the village, you can see plenty of artists painting pictures. Right there, out on the street. It’s pretty cool to watch.


Here, some folks are examining a freshly painted canvas

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By dinner time, the gang was all here:


The gang’s all here!

23 Apr

By

Shenzhen travel log. Day 0: Arrival day

April 23, 2017 | By |

These are the quick & dirty travel notes from a trip to Shenzhen, China. Read all posts from this series here (tag: ViewSourceII), or all blog posts relating to Shenzhen here (tag: Shenzhen). The latter one includes last fall’s trip to Shenzhen as well.

For the first time I arrive by ferry.

View from the ferry

A new terminal opened up. The subway doesn’t connect yet, so shuttle buses are the interim solution. The super short immigration lines make it so worth the extra distance and slightly longer travel time.

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Buying a new data SIM for the mobile WiFi hospital I got last time. The fourth shop seems to sell them, maybe. But my request still seems unusual, or maybe the language barrier is too high. Maybe it’s just that they don’t want to sell me anything that not the perfect fit; folks Herr know how it be price sensitivities about the these kind of things. At one point, no less than 7 people are conferring about my case, at least 3 of them using translation apps simultaneously. In the end, 20 Euros buy me 6G and I’m happy.

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The large construction site from our last visit has turned into a giant, quite enjoyable pedestrian area.

New Shenzhen pedestrian area

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On the sidewalk, under a small quad copter a mini robot balances what looks like a human-sized coffee cup. Turns out it’s a big roll of packing tape.

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Old v new: I love the constant contrast in China.

Hand-drawn cart on a construction site

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I walk by some urban villages and am surprised to find them surrounded by fences, like a gated community. Who’s keeping whom in, and whom out?

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Brightly color share bikes are everywhere. Orange, blue or yellow: Bike sharing is huge in Shenzhen.

Share bikes

Alas, without a Chinese bank account it seems impossible to rent them, or maybe I just haven’t figured out how.

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With my non-Chinese bank account, my credit card is often useless. What’s worse, I can’t hook it up with Wechat to pay for things. With cash I’m often clearly a nuisance when it comes to paying: people have to leave the cash register to handle bills, or ask their colleagues for change. In Shenzhen it’s all about in-app payments.

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From the hotel’s glass elevator I spot a small urban rooftop garden on a neighboring building:

Urban rooftop garden

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The number or drones is mind blowing. There’s a constant buzz along the main street, that special angry insectoid buzz of small quadcopters. Two older men carry still-boxed drones, a mom carries one marketed as “flying car” toy. Young shop staffer show off the their remote controlled airborne wares by flying them over and into the crowd and back.

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A club ad on a giant video screen: “Shenzhen. The changes of the times. 21 years of brand precipitation.”

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5 o’clock: the selling is done for the day. Shenzhen has shifted gear into fulfillment mode. Boxes, stacks of boxes, piles of boxes wherever you look. On trucks, bikes, hand-drawn carts, or shoulders: the city is digesting it’s electronics and getting ready to excrete them. In neat, tape-wrapped boxes.

31 Jan

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Travel log: Spokane & Mexiko 2017

January 31, 2017 | By |

Note: When I realized I hadn’t posted these notes from a trip to Spokane and Mexico in December 2016 and January 2017, it had already been more than 6 months. The notes were largely written at the time. I hope I managed to match the photos correctly. For future ease-of-understanding of the chronology, this post was posted on 8 August 2017 but is backdated to 31 January 2017.

Spokane

“It’s going to get a little weird in here”, the woman behind the Alaska Air counter at the boarding gate announced. I knew the trip had officially begun. I had just gotten into Seattle SEA TEC on a connection via Frankfurt with a solid delay, and had hurried through the airport trying to catch this last leg to Spokane. I needn’t have worried: immigration, customs and security were efficient and friendly and quick. I made it just in time. Until we learned that our next plane, some smallish propeller thing, hadn’t yet arrived. “We have two flights to Spokane going out almost at the same time side by side, and the one on the right is delayed, and has in gave not yet arrived. It’s going to get a little weird in here.”

I instantly liked Seattle.

A quick propeller hop later I see my extended family at the Spokane airport (and later that night even my luggage joins us there).

As a little side quest, I got to test our brand-new Zephyr Berlin pants—we had shipped them to our Kickstarter backers just the days before. Expect to see more of them below in the snow and across Mexico!
As a little side quest, I got to test our brand-new Zephyr Berlin pants—we had shipped them to our Kickstarter backers just the days before. Expect to see more of them below in the snow and across Mexico!

This particular American family Christmas consisted of a screening of Star Wars Rogue One, lots of good food and sampling of even better craft beer (omg, the Pacific Northwest and their amazing craft breweries!), and lots and lots of board games: Settlers, Ticket to Ride, Survive, Pandemic, Pergamon, Rummikub, Citadels, Istanbul were all in heavy rotation around the clock.

Constant snowing allowed for excellent snow and outdoor action. Downhill snow tubing. Building a snowy Jabba the Hutt. Drive to Coeur d’Alene (Idaho), to watch over half a dozen bald eagles soar across the lake. A long stroll along the snowed-under waterfront park and old expo grounds with the roaring river and many bridges.

We made a snow Jabba
We made a snow Jabba

Lake Coeur d'Alene
Lake Coeur d’Alene

Bald eagles at Coeur d'Alene
Bald eagles at Coeur d’Alene

Spokane river
Spokane river

Spokane's Radio Flyer
Spokane’s Radio Flyer

Spokane also has lots of cute little community-oriented shops. Auntie’s & Uncle’s is combined book and games store. Rocket Market is a small grocery store and gas station, but also clearly a hangout spot where locals socialize over great coffee and locally sourced snacks; if you tried to manifest Portland in a grocery store this would be it. A community center in Kendall Yards offers kids writing classes, reading space, and all the Arduinos and Raspberry Pis you could ask for to take your first into the the world of programming electronics.

We put the new Zephyr Berlin pants to the test making snow angels.
We put the new Zephyr Berlin pants to the test.

A week later, and our bags lightened by a large shipping box that takes our winter clothes back home, we’re headed south. 3 hops by plane and a long bus ride bring us to Palenque, Mexico, heart of Mexico’s rich heritage of temples and pyramids. We’ll be spending New Years Eve in the temple-studded jungle.

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Layover at LAX. The boarding pass check line is out on the sidewalk. Over the speaker an announcement: “We hope you have an exceptional experience at LAX.” What is this place?

Everything about our LAX experience, of this airport’s seemingly horrible infrastructure and disjointed structure, had a distinct feel of how a bad director would try to communicate a third world feel.

Arrival at Mexico

Mexico City. First tacos at Mexico City airport before heading on to Tuxtla Gutierrez.

The bus system works incredibly smooth. Over the shared entertainment system they screen a Spanish-dubbed version of Tarantino’s Hateful Eight. One passenger throws up behind us just as a character does on screen—perfect timing.

You got to love the hand-painted signage in Mexico.
You got to love the hand-painted signage in Mexico.

7 hours after leaving Tuxtla G. we arrive in Palenque. Tomorrow is going to be all about ruins.

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Small-town Mexico turns out very agreeable. Enchiladas all the way.

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It’s Dec 31st, the last day of the year. Today’s agenda: The Maya ruins of Palenque. In the 7th and 8th century this was the place of the power in Maya culture, and in Palenque you can still see evidence of the that today. The ruins are gorgeous. The tombs were the stuff of dreams for archeologists and explorers, with diamond-studded royal skeletons hidden in sarcophagi covered in either poisonous coating or sprinkled with intense red dye. New chambers and cultural treasures have been discovered as recently as the 1990s, and only a relatively compact part of the larger ancient settlement has been excavated and made accessible as of today.

Palenque
Palenque

Palenque
Palenque

The Red Queen's sarcophagus
The Red Queen’s sarcophagus

These ancient stone inscriptions look almost like modern comics
These ancient stone inscriptions look almost like modern comics

It’s touristy, but in a pretty low-key kind of way, and very accessible if you’ re happy to climb the kind of steep steps that make up Mayan temples you won’t be disappointed.

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Outside of the ruins but still inside the national park border, the low key hotel Maya Bell offers a cozy setting for lunch with an acoustic backdrop of howler monkeys.

We were still in a walking and exploring mood. A 20 min stroll brought us to a group of bars, restaurants and hostels called El Panchan, which our guide book curiously labeled “legendary” (I was preparing for the worst). It ended up looking like a place that once was home to the alternative backpacking crowd: small paths through the jungle, a semi-resident howler monkey, a few bars, little path lights shaped like mushrooms. Today it mostly looked like it is home to no one in particular. It’s as if the old crowd moved out and on, and nobody really new moved in. That said, the decidedly mainstream restaurant at the entrance looked like it was fairly popular with the locals even as the bar right behind it seemed to ever only host a small contingent of stoned long term travelers. (It is run by German expats. The Kässpätzle on their menu give them a away.)

We headed back to Maya Bell for dinner and crash early. We had a 5:30 bus to catch.

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Our hotel hosts an enormous, or at least enormously loud, New Year’s Eve party. Around 3 it transitions from live music to drunk karaoke. Our room isn’t insulated against this at all. At 4:30 we get back up. I’m grumpy, but not for long: We’re off on a 6am bus to San Cristobal.

San Cristobal de las Casas

San Cristobal de Casas is the center of Chiapas with its many (seven?) tribes that descend from ancient Maya. At about 2000m above sea level the light is crisp and the air starts feeling just that little bit thinner.

The bright, delightful colors of Mexico really shine in the mountain light.

A balloon vendor in San Cristobal
A balloon vendor in San Cristobal

Keeping it real in San Cristobal
Keeping it real in San Cristobal

Global pop culture franchises are omnipresent
Global pop culture franchises are omnipresent

Colors of Mexico
Colors of Mexico

Colors of Mexico
Colors of Mexico

Colors of Mexico
Colors of Mexico


Spongebob Churrospants
Spongebob Churrospants

San Cristobal is also a the city where the Zapatistas emerged on Jan 1st, 1994 – 23 years to the day before we arrived in town. There are references to Zapatistas everywhere here: figurines, postcards, books, graffiti. The politics around Zapatistas are complex, especially how they fit into the the larger political ecosystem. Modeled as a resistance movement in the mid-1990s they fought four the rights of indigenous people in this region, but there are also seemingly odd alliances with protestantism (the region is dominated by Catholic church), so some indigenous peoples supposedly them, others don’t. Because they emerged in the mid-1990s, during a wave of worldwide anti-globalization movements and in the early days of the internet, they seemed to speak a new language than their 1960s style predecessor leftist movements, which brought them global attention despite their very regionally limited sphere of influence. Anyway, the point is that even today you can’t walk 100m without seeing zapatista paraphernalia for sale.

Na Bolom's beautiful courtyard
Na Bolom’s beautiful courtyard

Frans Blom, co-founder of Na Bolom, was a member of the Explorers Club. It seems like this would have been a fun club to be part of!
Frans Blom, co-founder of Na Bolom, was a member of the Explorers Club. It seems like this would have been a fun club to be part of!

We stayed at Na Bolom, a museum-cum-accommodation founded by a researcher couple who in the 1940s through the 1960s researched, documented, and fought for the rights of indigenous people. It also happens to be a gorgeous place to while away some days, with sunny courtyards, library and a large garden.

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Witnessing any movement of a cash transporter, like maybe to fill up an ATM, is a bit of a spectacle to me given I’ve lived my life in places with strong gun control or at least no “open carry” legislation. Even when the truck is in traffic, 2-3 men with shotguns head up the truck to secure the transport. Every now and then we see pickup trucks with people in the back holding shotguns or automatic weapons. If they wear any uniforms it’s unclear what kind. I’ve been seeing a lot of heavy firearms these last few days.

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We instantly fell in love with a local coffee shop, Carajillo Slow Coffee. An excellent place that works with local coffee farmers (and also roasts locally) and has been around for 5 years. Naturally there’s also a hipster-ish craft beer place down the street. There’s something about finding these places, so globally similar in atmosphere and style yet so deeply rooted in local craft, that is just beautiful.

With its beautiful cobblestone streets and local crafts, its ubiquitous great, popping colors, and the ever-present fantastic local food there couldn’t be a better place to experience Chiapas.

Oaxaca city

Mexico’s bus system is excellent. The network is dense, busses are plenty, prices are low. Reserving tickets by app couldn’t be smoother or easier. In the better classes, busses are very comfortable, too. Distances are long and roads windy, though, so the ride from San Cristobal to Oaxaca City would take a some 10 hours. We decide to cheat a little and fly.

We decide to cheat a little and fly one leg.
We decide to cheat a little and fly one leg.

Back to Tuxtla and onto one of these 30-or-so propeller machines that’s not significantly larger than the luggage tractor. The flight is short, the view of the mountains spectacular.

A little later we’re headed into Oaxaca City, population half a million. The outskirts look so generic we might as well be driving through the sprawl around Miami, but once we’re in the old center Oaxaca welcomes us with beautiful old buildings, lovely galleries and art and design, and more cute and inviting restaurants, bars and coffee shops than we can count.

Oaxaca City
Oaxaca City

Balloon vendors at Oaxaca City
Balloon vendors at Oaxaca City

Local archeological findings
Local archeological findings

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Tip: Alebrijes, stunning animal figurines hand-painted with incredibly detailed geometric patterns. The high-end ones at gallery Voces de Bocal are jaw-droppingly beautiful.

We visit the workshop of the Jacobo and Maria Angeles where they are made, and end up with a few of our own. The whole village of St Martin makes the them, it’s a half-hour drive or so south of Oaxaca.

A large *alebrije* in the making.
A large alebrije in the making.

At this table, *alebrijes* makers train to gather experience.
At this table, alebrijes makers train to gather experience.

Alebrijes are available in various styles and across all ranges of price and detail. I loved the ones by Jacobo and Maria Angeles.
Alebrijes are available in various styles and across all ranges of price and detail. I loved the ones by Jacobo and Maria Angeles.

The gallery of J & M Angeles
The gallery of J & M Angeles

Part of our haul: This owl from the gallery of Jacobo and Maria Angeles
Part of our haul: This owl from the gallery of Jacobo and Maria Angeles

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Tip: Q Tiene is a high-end store for women’s fashion designed and made locally. Designs draw on local traditions but are decidedly contemporary and playful. These dresses would easily work in London, New York or Berlin just as well.

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Tip: Ceviche with almond sauce at La Popular.

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People watching from the bus
People watching from the bus

Textile museum
Textile museum

Colors at a local art museum
Colors at a local art museum

Hand-written signs
Hand-written signs

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Monte Alban. The first urban layout in the Americas. An initially Zapotec (later probably also Oltec) settlement, this was the capital of the the region around 400-800 AD (or so), and it is was a distinct state, with a working administration (priests). More importantly to our visit, it’s one of the Americas’ most important archeological sites and event today looks impressive. Situated on a mountain at the intersection of three major valleys, the views from these pyramids go on forever. It’s a magical atmosphere.

Monte Alban
Monte Alban

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At a bus station, the local take on the usual global pop culture franchises.
At a bus station, the local take on the usual global pop culture franchises.

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Oaxaca Coast

A seemingly never-ending 10-11h bus ride brings us to San Angostillo (via Puchuctla?), a tiny town – pop 290 – on the Pacific coast of Mexico. It’s gorgeous, a little paradise of one street and one long-term beach. This is as chill as it gets.

San Angostillo
San Angostillo

One town over, there’s a little more party. Here it’s as laid back as can get, and with good food to boot.

Swimming here is tricky, this coast is full of hard-to-read treacherous currents. But there’s easy, beginner friendly surfing to be had. (An hour north of here, there’s someone serious world class surfing to be had at Puerto Escondido, but I don’t want to die today.)

San Angostillo sunset
San Angostillo sunset

Above the break, pelicans lazily swoop along, scanning for easy prey.

//

An easy 10 min stroll leads to these neighboring town Menzunte. It would be seem to touch cater to more of a laid back party crowd, but Menzunte has a small but important turtle center. This region of Mexico is one of of the largest and most important turtle hatching regions of the world. It’s small and not fancy, but you can learn a bit about different types of turtle and the efforts to protect them hole watching them seem gracefully in aquariums.

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Having come down with a bit of a hefty fever, I find myself lying flat on my back on a doctor’s bench in a dark room, staring at a seal-colored ceiling with four circular fluorescent lights. One of them is broken. The paint peels off the walls and ceiling. We communicate through a mix of broken English and Spanish. The doctor uses her iPhone a lot—for translation or for the diagnosis I’m not sure at the time. I shouldn’t have worried: Within moments she’s ruled out all the the dangerous options of my vague mix of symptoms, diagnoses my light infection and gives me all the medication I’ll need. The cost of the whole process, including medication, is under 25 euros.

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Beach life grows on me.
Beach life grows on me.

Beach life grows on me. If it weren’t for my brief sick spell I’d have oscillated between surfing, snorkeling, reading and drinking fresh limonadas all week long and not have regretted a moment. As it is my activities start out sporty early in the week and as my fever keeps me (as a precaution more than necessity) out of the water I skew more towards listening to podcasts in a shady hammock and reading. On day 3 I subscribe to The Atlantic from my phone.

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Tiny airports are the best.
Tiny airports are the best.

Aeropuerto Puerto Escondido (PXM) is a tiny and excellent airport. It’s a tiny parking lot, a tiny square main hall, and two small gates. We had come to Puerto Escondido earlier in the day to see if the town a bit and ended up having lunch at the beach. From there, taking the cab to the airport, check-in and security – the whole journey beach to airport – took less than twenty minutes.

Mexico City

Landing at Mexico City I confirm a sneaking suspicion: My body adjusts slowly to altitudes. Even if the 2.5K meters above sea level register in my head as a sight buzzing pressure. Note to self.

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Street art
Street art

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Accidentally booked this SUV from the airport.
Accidentally booked this SUV from the airport.

The airport cab turns out to be a huge white SUV. We glide through the night, arriving in true gangsta style. Even with my very, very limited Spanish I understand than the driver non-stop interrogates Michelle about her religious beliefs.

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In the center of the historic old town lays Zocala, the central plaza. Presidential palace and the cathedral rub shoulders and it might be easy to miss the maybe most important thing about them: They, and everything else here, is built on top of Aztec temples. And not just any old temples, but the ones that made up the center of the Aztec universe.

The Sun Disc
The Sun Disc

A giant carved stone, the Sun Disc, was found here and it’s thought to signify the very place where Aztec mythology saw an eagle appear on a cactus, snake in beak: The symbol of the center of the universe and reason the Aztec capital was centered on the this very spot. Today, the symbol of Eagle with snake on cactus is also a the center of the Mexican flag.

The eagle grabbing the snake is part of Mexico's founding myth.
The eagle grabbing the snake is part of Mexico’s founding myth.

All of the these temples and government buildings were torn down or built over by the Spaniards and hidden under their own representative edifices: hence the cathedral and presidential palace. Part of templo mejor, the main temple, are excavated and accessible today in a museum. The Sun Disc is on display in the most excellent anthropology museum.

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A viewing platform from the LatinoAmericano, a 60s style skyscraper, drives home just how big Mexico City is. With its 25 or so million population and an overall seemingly relatively low build it extends on and on in all directions to the horizon.

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Leaving the fever district (Mexican City) today the North you enter Mexico State. Right around the border, a gondola line crosses the highway. It’s an actual transportation system, not for touristic use. The area is a mix of industrial, highway and low cost housing, and around we see the hillsides full of colorful houses. Without the gondolas it’d be tough to get across the thread highways.

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Tlacoyos are oval-shaped fried cakes made of masa, stuffed with cooked or ground beans, cheese, fava beans, chicharron or other stuff. Wikipedia describes them as “somewhat torpedo-shaped”, but still pretty flat. We had some made with blue corn flower so that they were a deep purple color. Incredibly flavorful.

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Tip: Restaurant La Guapachosa (Av. Oaxaca 31 Local B, Puebla, Foursquare) is an excellent cute little low-key eatery at the very northern tip of Roma Norte. Doesn’t look like much, but oh boy is their slightly-updated take on traditional Mexican food yummy.

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Tip: GoodbyeFolk vintage and locally designs

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The Museum of Anthropology is absolutely worth spending an afternoon in. Learned a lot!

The Museum of Anthropology
The Museum of Anthropology

The world's first book, if I remember correctly.
The world’s first book, if I remember correctly.

Local craft at the museum shop
Local craft at the museum shop

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Just outside Mexico City, you can find some of the world’s most relevant & impressive pyramids. Don’t miss them!

The pyramid of the sun
The pyramid of the sun

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We stayed in Roma Norte, a lovely (and by the feel of it, heavily gentrifying) neighborhood that made me feel right at home.

The local coffee shop
The local coffee shop

We followed the white rabbit, and it led us to a lovely tiny designer store
We followed the white rabbit, and it led us to a lovely tiny designer store

A local design museum, the Museo de Objeto de Objeto, is lovely and absolutely worth it. When we were there, they had a great exhibition of domestic life—particularly kitchens—throughout Mexico’s history.

A Holy-Mother-Maria tortilla maker
A Holy-Mother-Maria tortilla maker

Turns out IBM used to make kitchen scales
Turns out IBM used to make kitchen scales

Tiny kitchen
Tiny kitchen

There's excellent sneaker shopping in Roma Norte, too.
There’s excellent sneaker shopping in Roma Norte, too.

Mexico City has lots going on. We spend some time exploring not just Roma Norte and the city’s museums but also Condesa, Zona Rosa, Juarez, Frida Kahlo’s old neighborhood, and others. A few memorable moments:

A day trip to the canal network in Mexico City's south can be quite nice. It's pretty aggressively touristy, and the boat trip operators put on quite a hustle, but this *mariachi* band made it worth the trip.
A day trip to the canal network in Mexico City’s south can be quite nice. It’s pretty aggressively touristy, and the boat trip operators put on quite a hustle, but this mariachi band made it worth the trip.

Ice delivery
Ice delivery

Colorful houses on the side of a hill on the way to the pyramids
Colorful houses on the side of a hill on the way to the pyramids

There’s excellent street food all over the city. The little food stalls around larger subway stations are a treasure trove of fantastic snacks. If you’re looking for a slightly fancier setting and/or “upscale” street food/gourmet food, Mercado Roma is pretty good.

Lucha libre? I wouldn’t miss it! The performances are great fun, in a totally over-the-top kind of way. Grab some pop corn and a drink and lean back. It’s like a less polished version of WWF, with great audience engagement. There’s tag teams, yelling, throwing of popcorn, high fives. There are bands, and insults, and chases through the audience. It’s so worth it.

The roles are announced unambiguously up front, and might reference the day’s events: Who’s the good guy, who’s the bad guy? There’s never a doubt. When we were there it was the day of Trump’s inauguration, so one of the libradores was waving a trump flag—he was the bad guy. The arena went into a frenzy of booing.

Lots of matches! We were lucky, our apartment was just around the corner of the arena.
Lots of matches! We were lucky, our apartment was just around the corner of the arena.

Libradores know what their audience wants. This one's taking photos with a young fan.
Libradores know what their audience wants. This one’s taking photos with a young fan.

24 Nov

By

Days 12-15: Hong Kong

November 24, 2016 | By |

Note: These are the more personal, non-work related notes to complement the blog posts to this work trip to China which you can find using the Viewsource tag.

Day 12

We’re off to Hong Kong. The border crossing seems a little awkward – you leave the country, sort of, and fill in another immigration card – but then we’re in Hong Kong in less than an hour.

We stay in south Kowloon, near Tsim Sha Tsui station. I picked that neighborhood because I had stayed here once before, about a decade ago. I was a student then, staying at Mirador Mansion, a run-down, somewhat sketchy block of cheap accommodation and sister building to the (then) more (in)famous Chungking Mansion, and was curious to see how it had developed since.

Chungking Mansion (2016)
Chungking Mansion (2016) as seen from a Starbucks across the street

These days, this neighborhood seems properly gentrified with tons of high-end brand stores along Nathan Road, and very touristy.

The evening is just for walking around the extended neighborhood and food, plus a final stop at a dessert place.

Day 13

A long night’s sleep, then off to explore. Swing-by at Mirador Mansion. Not as creepy as I remember it. Maybe it’s been renovated a little, maybe it’s because it’s day time, maybe my take on it just has changed. We discover an absolutely lovely-looking and super popular bakery inside. I still wouldn’t want to stay though, so we head on out to Hong Kong Island.

We take the beautiful old Star Ferry, and head on up the Escalators. It’s a charming, rickety system of escalators that was built to bring commuters from Victoria Peak down into their office and back up. It’s a network of short connected escalator hops, and seems like straight out of a time capsule. It was built in 1993 but looks a lot older. Fun! We jump off a couple of times to have a look around or stop for a coffee.

Escalators
Escalator signs

Escalators
Going up the escalators

Escalators
The escalators get commuters up and down the hill from and to Central

We stroll through the Botanical Garden, but when we arrive at the Peak Tram terminus the lines are too long. It’s Sunday, and all of Hong Kong is out and about.

Near Central, we see hundreds of Philippinas socializing in the long network of connected walkways: It’s their day off (see this article about Maid Day), and this is where you go to hang out. Out of cardboard each group has built a tidy little living room and people are laughing, eating, chatting.

Hong Kong has even more elevated walkways than I remember. All of them are protected from rain, you can get from pretty much anywhere to anywhere else without getting wet during rainy season. We’re lucky: It’s super sunny and nice out.

In the afternoon, off to Causeway Bay for some window shopping and a visit to the Cat Café.

neon
Old school Hong Kong neon lights

Evening is for Temple Street night market, which has crappy stalls but decent street food, then on to Butler, an excellent Japanese whiskey bar.

Japanese bars are the best bars.
Butler is a beautiful Japanese whiskey bar

Day 14

The morning is for work at Starbucks, the only place I don’t feel bad about using up sitting space for longer periods of time.

Then off to Central for lunch and some window shopping. Lunch at Kuroko Ramen (so so), followed by espresso at Coco next door (excellent!).

We check out PMQ, a design/artist quarter in a former police quarter. There’s two buildings full of (often locally design, sometimes well-curated international) design to be had: clothes, jewelry, prints, knick-knacks.

The peak tram takes us up to the peak. It’s totally overrun by the masses. Instead of taking it back down, we take a long slow walk down Old Peak Road, which is much more enjoyable.

Old Peak Road
Old Peak Road

Old Peak Road
Halfway down Old Peak Road, a view across the skyline opens up

By then, with excellent timing, Alper points out that the most excellent Tokyo-based Omotesando coffee has opened a Hong Kong branch: We head there right away.

Omotesando Koffee
Omotesando Tokyo, a few years ago

Omotesando Hong Kong <3
Omotesando Hong Kong

At so-called “toy street” next door, where there supposedly used to be a lot of old school toy stores from back in the day when Hong Kong did manufacturing, we find only one tiny (!) toy store left, next to a lovely (and equally tiny) barber shop. I can’t resist an early 1980s metal wind-up dinosaur.

Toy road
Tiny toy store is tiny

A viewing platform is on the way, so we head on up there before hunting some more Szechuan food, then on a whim decide to go for rooftop drinks at Wooloomooloo rooftop bar. Hong Kong does skylines and rooftop bars really well.

Wan Chai night view
Hong Kong does skyline really well

Day 15

We follow the same morning routine: Work from Starbucks office in the morning, then delicious dumpling lunch.

We buy small gifts, then head on over to the site of the former Kowloon Walled City. Today Kowloon Walled City Park is just a beautiful park. The history of the walled city is super interesting, though, a story about living in interstitial zones, bottom-up organization, and historic anomalies. (There’s a fascinating interactive online project that gives a glimpse into Kowloon Walled City.)

Kowloon Walled City Park
A model of Kowloon Walled City inside the park. Estimates vary wildly, but inside Kowloon Walled City there lived somewhere around 30-50K people. According to the plaque, this model is based on a (Japanese?) research team that went in and did in-depth research about the place just before it was torn down.

On the way back through Kowloon, we pop into a game arcade (m88). As arcades go, this one isn’t in great shape, but we do play a few fun games at about a million decibels.

At Sino Centre we discover a proper nerd mall. Only after we leave Hong Kong do I learn that the NES Classic consoles I saw there were real and that they’re sold out all over the world. Ah well, missed that one.

We look at 1950s Mido Cafe, but opt for bubble tea in the park. Beat from the day, we opt for a massage, dinner, some last minute shopping, then head to the airport with time to spare.

Airport tipp: At terminal 1, “Goods of Desire” is a local design brand that has some cute (and small, hence easy-to-transport) last minute gifts.