Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

sharing

15 Oct

By

ATT & Cargo Cults

October 15, 2012 | By |

Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Image by One Laptop Per Child (CC by)

 

As BoingBoing reports, a leaked memo indicates that AT&T will introduce a creepy and stupid policy: If a user is suspected of copyright infringement (by which means is unclear – Hadopi style maybe?) repeatedly, AT&T will block access to Youtube and other sites and instead re-direct that user to an “on-line education tutorial”, and only after completing said tutorial will allow their users again to access the web as they please.

All the enforcement issues and the details of this particular instance aside, the political implications of what’s been going on in the world of copyright enforcement over the last 10-15 years are so creepy and skewed that it’s hard to believe we’re still even talking about this. And that a company would still even consider the option to screw their customers without a legal warrant or equivalent, just like that. When did that become acceptable?

I’m guessing that in 10 years or so we’ll look back at this era and laugh about it like today we laugh about Cargo Cults.

Unless, that is, we won’t be laughing about it because this is still going on, but then it’d be a world I wouldn’t want to live in.

Catch up to the 21st century some time soon & find business models where you get paid voluntarily without suing or surveilling anyone?

More on Boingboing.

27 Aug

By

Share your instagrams / defaults matter

August 27, 2012 | By |

by David R. Politi, licensed under Creative Commons by-nc license

I love the idea of i-am-cc.org, a tool to license your Instagram photos under a Creative Commons license. It’s a simple way to share your photos, not as in over-share your personal live but as in allow others to build on (and with) your creative works.

Defaults matter: Since most services don’t allow for easy CC-licensing (Flickr being one of the few services that implemented that a long time ago), most photos uploaded aren’t shared under licenses that allow for example bloggers to post a photo on their personal blogs to illustrate their articles. Like the wonderfully gross one you see above, courtesy of David R. Politi, who licensed it as Creative Commons by-nc via i-am-cc.org.

More startups should think about the long play and the role they play in the larger ecosystem. Implementing a tool to license content under more permissive licenses than the get out of my backyard model that is “all rights reserved” (which the law defaults to, if the author doesn’t state a different intent) might bring some extra work with it, but it also allows for easy, massive contributions to the shared commons that we all on the web profit from.

Until then, I’m glad that simple tools like i-am-cc.org help us with a workaround. My personal workaround so far is, by the way, via the fantastic IFTTT: IFTTT checks for new uploads in my Instagram stream, then uploads them to my Flickr account. There, as mentioned above, my default license is Creative Commons (by-nc-sa), so you can use my photos for non-commercial uses like your personal blog. Plus, unlike at Instagram that is built primarily to make instantaneous sharing easy, it’s easier to search Flickr streams and embed photos. Admittedly, it takes some effort to pipe your photos across the web like that.

So I’m quite happy about tools that make sharing easier, and that hopefully get more companies to build sharing into their products, in responsible, user-controlled, non-creepy ways.

07 Dec

By

Readmill launches, rocks, makes Kindle Highlights useful

December 7, 2011 | By |

I love my Kindle. It’s a fantastic device for reading. For anything else, it’s ridiculously bad. The device comes with a keyboard and connects to the interwebs, yet trying to share quotes from the Kindle with the web at large is a pain.

Amazon implemented a feature called “Highlights“. Yet, it’s not entirely clear what they are for, and they’re awkward at best. Fred Wilson described how he hacks around the Kindle’s limitations. My friend Martin shared his Kindle woes. (Speaking of feature requests: As Martin pointed out, currently Amazon only lets you share highlights from books bought through Amazon; any document you transferred to your Kindle in another way won’t do. Change that, please, Amazon?) There’s many of us who would love to use Highlights, if it got just a little more love from Amazon than it currently does.

Enter Readmill, which officially launched today. (Congrats, guys – fantastic job!) And here’s a way to get the Kindle Highlights to where they belong: a reading community.

Today we take Readmill, tomorrow the world! Kidding. But once your quotes are inside Readmill, they actually become useful, both for use within Readmill and to export it from there to other places via the Readmill API and integration of other services like Tumblr. ‘s good! Go sign up.

07 Sep

By

Design Made In Germany Magazine

September 7, 2010 | By |

It’s rare that I post a random design piece or the like in this blog. But I do urge you to check out the Design Made In Germany magazine:

Why? Not only is it a good magazine. They also got the web part exactly right: The layout adjusts fluidly and smoothly to all screen sizes (including mobile). The web version is playful and gorgeous. There’s feedback buttons on every page. And it’s all shareable. In fact, it’s all made to share. There’s the standard tweet & “i like” buttons, but you can even (like I did above) embed the whole magazine in your website (embed codes).

The whole thing is one consistent experience across all platforms. Great, great, great!